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  Racking 'Em UpóComment
  Posted by: jimdroot on Nov-24-08 2:15 PM (EST)
 

A big point of Tamia's article focused on the propensity for boats to shift on a rack while driving. I use a standard yakima bar rack on a couple of different cars that is pretty slippery when a canoe is on it's gunwhales. Years ago, I put 4 short (about 4"long) sections of split radiator hose over them wherever the gunwhales contacted the bars. My main reason was to protect the wood on my restored cedar and canvas Old Town canoe. But what I found was the rubber hose stuck like glue to the bars and the canoe has never budged a fraction of an inch once strapped on. For short trips, I have even forgone bow and stern lines (no highway driving) when in a hurry.

I've since used the rubber hose pieces on any boat I tie down- aluminum, plastic gunwhales, whatever. The boats lock on so tightly. They just don't budge. I also use the rubber hose method when tying lumber or other things to my roof rack. Things just grip so much better than on a bare rail.

I do still use tiedowns bow and stern for additional safety in general. Some of it is piece of mind in case there is some catastrophic rack failure to know the boat won't go sailing off the roof of the car but it does make sense to stabilize a long craft in any wind situation you might drive through.

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